Educational Psychology – Meaning, Nature, Importance, Scope and MCQs | Educational Psychology Notes

Educational Psychology

Educational Psychology

Meaning of Educational Psychology

The study of psychology entails the observation and measurement of behavior and the activities of living creatures. Education is primarily concerned with modifying the behavior of children within a controlled environment. Studying the science of behavior will help in shaping the behavior of a subject and bringing positive or negative changes. As a successful teacher, you must be aware of the developmental stages and characteristics of your students.

Educational psychologists are concerned with children’s learning and development. In order to assist those having difficulties with learning, behavior, or social adjustment, they use their special skills in psychological and educational assessment techniques. Educators study individual development within educational settings using educational psychology as a method. Students’ skills are enhanced and the teacher’s understanding of them is enhanced as a result. Psychology and education are two fields that are combined in educational psychology. Educating to realize life goals involves understanding, predicting, and guiding human behavior.

Educational psychology is the science of studying the processes by which humans acquire knowledge and retain it, mostly through educational settings like classrooms. The learning process includes emotional, social, and cognitive components. The aim of research in educational psychology is to test the theories that guide the actions of those involved in education.

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Contemporary Psychology – Multiple Choice Questions (MCQs) | Psychology

Contemporary Psychology

  Contemporary Psychology 

What do you mean by Contemporary Psychology?

The term contemporary psychology refers to a broad area of psychology that utilizes modern research approaches and studies while incorporating old paradigms. Cognitive Revolution includes contemporary psychology. In the 1960s, the cognitive revolution began and interest returned to mental processes.

Cognitive psychology studies the ways in which information is processed, remembered, and perceived, as well as the cognitive roots of psychological disorders. Contemporary psychologists rely heavily on empirical evidence in their research studies. Ancient scholars studied human nature primarily through anecdotes, in contrast to modern psychologists.

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Interposition Psychology – What is Interposition in Psychology? | Monocular Cues For Depth Perception

Interposition Psychology

Interposition Psychology

Interposition Psychology Definition

According to an Oxford Dictionary, “Interposition Psychology” is the placement of monocular cues of visual depth perception and overlapping another object. The overlapping object looks closer than the monocular cue, which is the backend. When one object blocks the path of another, the blocked object is perceived as more distant. 

Interposition is the act of overlapping two objects to give the illusion of depth. Interposition is one of the Monocular Cues For Depth Perception. Monocular cues are formed when one object partially covers another, known as interposition or overlapping. By doing so, it appears as if the object that is being covered is the one that is further away. Any stimulus related to depth perception which can be perceived with one eye alone is a monocular cue. As opposed to binocular cues, in which the depth is perceived by using both eyes at the same time.

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For managers, the importance of maslow’s contribution is that he showed that workers

For managers, the importance of maslow's contribution is that he showed that workers

For managers, the importance of maslow’s contribution is that he showed that workers

a) Have needs beyond that of just earning a paycheck
b) Perform the same work as the people they manage but earn more money
c) Are typically involved with producing the organization’s products or providing its service
d) Are at the top of the organizational chart

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Proximodistal Development – Concept ,Principle and Example | Psychology

Proximodistal Development

Proximodistal Development

Proximodistal development describes the general trend for the development of motor abilities to occur from the center outwards. First, the middle develops and then the movement spreads outward. Infants learn to move their torsos first, then their arms and legs. Finger manipulation and other finely tuned movements will develop once motor skills for their limbs are developed. Motor development proceeds from the center of an organism to the periphery via proximodistal development.

Early motor skills are learned by parts of the body that are closest to the trunk before parts farther away in proximodistal development. In other words, gross motor skills like waving an arm develop before fine motor skills like writing legibly.

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Source Monitoring Error – Concept, Examples and Types | General Psychology

Source Monitoring Error

Source Monitoring Error

The source monitoring errors occur when normal memory recall and perception are disrupted, resulting in a memory error. The source monitoring process is an unconscious mental test humans perform to determine if a memory is “real” and accurate and not derived from an extraneous source such as a dream or a movie. The source of a memory or idea can be found in many different places. In the event that source monitoring is disrupted, errors in recall can occur. An instance of this is when a memory is falsely attributed to an incident recalled in the past.

Source Monitoring is a set of processes involved in determining how memories, knowledge, and beliefs are derived.” In addition to the reality monitoring that determines internal or external origin, Source Monitoring is the process of understanding and identifying the external source (external monitoring), and determining what is said or acted based on what the individual imagined or thought (internal monitoring).

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Differential Reinforcement – Forms of Differential Reinforcement | Psychology

Differential Reinforcement

Differential Reinforcement

Differential Reinforcement is defined as the implementation of reinforcing to a specific class of behavior while withholding reinforcement for other classes of behavior. All differential reinforcement procedures combine the use of two principles of behavior that include: Reinforcement and Extinction. When you first apply differential reinforcement, you must start by reinforcing desirable behavior (alternative or other behavior) very frequently.

The theory behind differential reinforcement is that people tend to repeat those behaviors that are reinforced or rewarded and are less likely to continue behaviors that aren’t reinforced .There are several types of differential reinforcement; however, they all share the same principles of reinforcing desired behavior which are explained below:

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Attribution Theory of Perception – Determinants of Attribution Theory | Attribution Error

Attribution Theory

What is Attribution Theory

Attribution is a process by which people interpret the causes of their own and others behavior. It is concerned with an individual’s interpretation of events and its relation to their thinking and behavior. There is internal and external attribution affected by internal and external determinants. Internal determinants are ability, attitudes, mood etc. External determinants are task, people, situation etc. Internally caused behavior is under personal control of an individual whereas externally caused behavior is believed to be driven by situational factors that forces individuals to show certain behavior. The cause of various behaviors of every person is different. For understanding individual’s behavior it is necessary to observe them wisely. Therefore, Attribution Theory was designed to account for how people explain others’ behavior.

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